Understanding New York’s evaluation system

The Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR)

 

School districts in Rensselaer, Columbia and Greene counties are working with Questar III BOCES on a regional approach to implementing APPR and other Race to the Top initiatives. This not only helps districts share the cost, but it also allows us to share best practices.


For more information on Teacher / Leader Effectiveness, please visit http://engageny.org/effective-practice or contact our School Improvement Office at 518-477-8771.

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

What is the Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR)?

How often are teachers and principals evaluated?

What does each component mean?

Will teachers and principals receive report cards or grades?

Where can I find information on my district’s APPR?

Is this something new?

What happens if a teacher or principal scores poorly?

Does the APPR evaluation determine employment status, compensation, training?

Can I obtain the rating of my child’s teacher or principal?

Who evaluates teachers and principals?

 

 

What is the Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR)?
The Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR) is an evaluation of a teacher’s or principal’s practice. A teacher’s practice must reflect the New York State teaching standards. A principal’s practice must reflect the standards for school leaders. Teacher and principal evaluations include student achievement and growth data.

Creating a statewide evaluation system linked to student performance was mandated by a law (Education Law section 3012-c) passed as part of New York’s successful Race to the Top (RTTT) application.

This is one of a number of statewide initiatives to improve student performance and assure that all students graduate from high school both college and career ready. Other initiatives include New York’s participation in the Common Core Standards, adoption of new teaching standards, and application of leadership standards for principals.

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How often are teachers and principals evaluated?
Teachers and principals are evaluated once a year. The evaluation has three parts.

    State Growth Component – 20%

    Locally Selected Measure Component – 20%

    Multiple Measures Component – 60%

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What does each component mean?
The 20-percent state growth component will be provided by New York State based on state assessments or through Student Learning Objectives.

  • For example, students in grades 4 – 8 take the ELA and Math state tests. Teachers of grades where the state has an assessment will receive a growth score from the state. Principals will also receive a score from the state based on state tests where available. Student growth scores are calculated using a formula taking into account student characteristics such as enrollment, demographics, previous scores in New York State tests, etc. It also accounts for how well students do when compared to similar students across New York State. Eventually this component will increase to 25 percent of the teacher and principal evaluation.

  • In grades or classes where there is no state assessment, teachers and principals will develop student learning objectives (SLOs). Student learning objectives are learning goals that teachers establish for their students at the beginning of the year or course. Students are tested at the beginning of the year or course and at the end of the course or year to determine progress or growth.
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    The 20-percent locally selected measure refers to a score calculated based on locally- selected tests for particular content areas and grades. Eventually this component will decrease to 15 percent of the teacher and principal evaluations.


    Sixty percent of the score is based on multiple measures. For example, teachers will be observed using a state approved rubric at least twice during a school year – one of the observations will be unannounced. This component may also include a structured review of artifacts such as lesson plans and student work samples. A district that chooses to include a structured review of artifacts will review them with a New York State approved rubric selected by the district.

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    Will teachers and principals receive report cards or grades?
    Teachers and principals will receive a single score between 0-100 each year. Each number rating is related to one of the following ratings:

      Highly Effective: 91-100

      Effective: 75-90       

      Developing: 65-74

      Ineffective: 0-64

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    Where can I find information on my district’s APPR?
    The district’s APPR is available on the district’s website.

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    Is this something new?
    No. Teachers and principals have always been evaluated. However, the evaluations now include student achievement data.

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    What happens if a teacher or principal scores poorly?
    If a teacher or principal receives a final rating of “developing” or “ineffective,” he/she will receive a teacher improvement plan or a principal improvement plan.

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    Does the APPR evaluation determine employment status, compensation, training?
    Yes. APPR will be a significant factor in employment decisions such as promotion, retention, tenure determination, termination, and supplemental compensation, as well as a significant factor in teacher and principal professional development.

    Tenured teachers and principals with a pattern of ineffective teaching or performance – defined by law as two consecutive annual “ineffective” ratings – may be charged with incompetence and considered for termination through an expedited hearing process.

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    Can I obtain the rating of my child’s teacher or principal?
    Yes. Per the Governor's Program Bill #48, parents may request the overall quality rating of their teacher or principal directly from the school.

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    Who evaluates teachers and principals?

    Teachers are evaluated by their principal or supervisor. Similarly, principals are evaluated by their supervisor or the superintendent. The law requires that evaluations be conducted by trained Lead Evaluators.

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